Luxury holiday cottages Suffolk

With its selection of luxury holiday cottages Suffolk is a great location for a get-together with family, friends or just as a couple. With a beautiful coastline dotted with family holiday resorts and delightful undulating countryside sprinkled with historic towns and charming villages, there’s so much to see and do for visitors to Suffolk. Here’s our guide to the Best Places To Visit and the Top Ten Things To Do in Suffolk.

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Best places to visit in Suffolk

If you are looking for luxury holiday cottages Suffolk is the place for you.

Halesworth

Halesworth is a town rich in heritage and history dating back to the Middle Ages. It reached the peak of its prosperity when the River Blyth, on which it sits, was made navigable in 1756 and greatly increased the town’s trade. Nowadays it is a major centre for the arts with events including the annual High Tide Festival and the Halesworth Arts Festival.

Bungay

Bungay is a vibrant and charming market town situated in a loop of the River Waveney and built around the remains of a Norman castle. Those who like the taste of the local ale can enjoy a visit to St Peters Brewery in the grounds of a 13th century hall on the outskirts of the town.

Woodbridge

Woodbridge is situated in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and there is perhaps no better way of seeing the surroundings than on a boat trip down the River Deben. Here you can visit the famous restored Tide Mill, which can be seen working depending on the tide.

Diss

Surrounded by the beautiful countryside of the Waveney Valley, Diss is situated just over the border in south Norfolk, and is a real little gem. Nowhere else in England will you find a market town built around a lake. Diss Mere is surrounded by trees, lawns and footpaths and is said to be one of the deepest inland lakes in the country. This beautiful picture-postcard market town claims to have been poet Sir John Betjeman’s favourite Norfolk haunt.

Eye

In the historic market town of Eye you will find timber-framed buildings, pretty thatched cottages, the stunning 15th century church, the magnificent town hall as well as splendid views from the castle ruin. Don’t miss the Eye Country Market every Wednesday in the main square – it was shortlisted on the BBC Good Food Programme Best Food Market 2009.

Dunwick

It’s hard to believe that the sleepy village of Dunwick, which lies south of Southwold and Walberswick, was once a bustling port and at one time the unofficial capital of East Anglia. Sadly, most of the old town has been taken by the sea. In the 13th century a large storm swept much of it away and the Dunwich River was partly silted up. The remainder of Dunwich was lost to the sea over a period of two to three hundred years.

Beccles

Beccles is an historic market town on the River Waveney, at the southern most point of the Norfolk Broads. A river port since medieval times, it is now a popular stop for pleasure craft with its pretty riverfront bordered by Georgian gardens sloping down to the water’s edge and a quayside which is the venue for the popular carnival and regatta. Beccles has preserved its historic centre and market square. The Bell Tower dominates the skyline, standing detached next to St Michael’s Church and affording spectacular views of the Broads National Park and rolling countryside to the south.

Bury St Edmunds

Bury St Edmunds is an historic market town in the west of the county. It was once home to one of the most powerful monasteries in mediaeval Europe and today boasts the only cathedral in Suffolk. This along with its elegant Georgian squares and Abbey gardens make it a most charming town. At one time this part of Suffolk possessed more pubs than churches. While the number of hostelries has dwindled down the years, the Greene King Brewery and Visitor Centre remains a popular attraction as well as The Nutshell, which claims to be the smallest pub in Britain.

Lowestoft

Lowestoft, once a small fishing village, is now one of East Anglia’s major holiday destinations. Famous for its wonderful stretches of award-winning beaches and rich maritime heritage the town of Lowestoft is situated close to the Norfolk Broads and is a perfect holiday location for the young and young-at-heart.

Framlingham

Framlingham

Framlingham

Framlingham is an ancient market town and a firm favourite with visitors and locals alike. In 2006 it was voted ‘the best place to live in the country’ by Country Life magazine. The town is dominated by its castle a magnificent 12th century fortress with a long and colourful past which makes for a fascinating family day out. Surrounding the castle is The Mere, a large lake and nature reserve, popular with walkers.

Newmarket

Newmarket is a small attractive market town famous throughout the world as the home of horseracing. As you arrive in the town, the impact of the horseracing industry is immediately obvious, not only because of the horse walks (pavements) and traffic lights (horse crossing warning lights and signs) that you will see, there to help them make their journey from yard to exercise grounds a safe one, but also because open heathland stretches for miles at both ends of the town, with the main training ground – Warren Hill – running right into the town centre. It is here you can go from Monday to Saturday, between sunrise and 1pm, to watch the horses and jockeys training. Horse lovers should head here to see a race or just visit the Horse Racing Museum.

Orford

Orford is arguably one of the prettiest villages on the Suffolk coast and a true historical gem. It is also known as a foodies’ paradise. On Saturdays there’s a weekly food market in the town hall on the market square where locals sell their produce. There are two smokeries in Orford, one specialising in fish and cheese, the other in oysters. Orford Ness is a 10-mile shingle spit separated from the mainland by the River Ore, and is a haven for wildlife – it’s home to the RSPB Sanctuary Havergate Island, famous for its waders and seabirds as well as the RPSB’s signature bird, the avocet.

Oulton Broad

Oulton Broad is located at the southern gateway to the Norfolk Broads. The life of Oulton Broad is inextricably linked to water with fishing, sailing, windsurfing and rowing on offer. Nicholas Everitt Park provides one of the most spectacular views over the broad, where you can sit back and relax to the sound of a Sunday afternoon brass band concert during the summer, enjoy the thrills of Thursday night powerboat racing or simply relax.

Southwold

Southwold

Southwold

Southwold is a quintessentially English seaside resort – the jewel in the crown of Suffolk coastal towns. Its sandy beach, with brightly coloured beach huts and sprawling dunes, is one of the most popular in the area. The recently refurbished pier offers a wide range of shops, eating places and amusements from the traditional to Tim Hunkin’s eccentric inventions. Down at the harbour fresh fish, caught daily by local fishermen, is sold from wooden huts. Southwold is home to the Adnams brewery, winner of The Good Pub Guide 2011’s ‘Brewery of the Year’ award. The brewery itself is very much the focal point of the town located just behind the high street and next to the magnificent whitewashed lighthouse

Lavenham

Lavenham

Lavenham

Lavenham is perhaps England’s finest medieval village. It was one of the wealthiest towns in England and retains an almost perfect medieval market square with many half-timbered houses lining its ancient streets.

Thorpeness

Thorpeness is a holiday resort with a difference. If ever there was a village that deserved to be called ‘fantastic’, it is Thorpeness. Created by Glencairn Stuart Ogilvie it has remained unspoilt since it was built in the 1920s. Ogilvie’s idea was to create the ideal holiday village ‘for people who want to experience life as it was when England was Merrie England.’ The House in the Clouds is one of the country’s most famous follies, originally the village’s water tower disguised as an overgrown house.

Walberswick

Walberswick was until recently a hidden gem, attracting residents drawn from the arts, film and media over many decades. Today it is one of Suffolk’s top tourist attractions. The long, open beach backed by sand dunes provides a gentle gradient into the sea which means there is safe and enjoyable bathing for all ages. Tucked away across the River Blyth from Southwold, the busy harbour with its dinghies, fishing boats, cruisers and yachts has a timeless quality. Around Walberswick is a network of footpaths that lead to local treasures such as the RSPB Minsmere Reserve via historic Dunwich or the beautiful Blyth estuary. The village is famous for its annual crabbing competition – The British Open Crabbing Championship – held every August. The person who catches the single heaviest crab within a period of 90 minutes is declared the winner. The proceeds go towards strengthening Walberswick’s sea defences.

Aldeburgh

Aldeburgh

Aldeburgh

Once a thriving fishing village, Aldeburgh is now a busy town brimming with character. It is blessed with breathtaking scenery, both seawards and following the river Alde inland. A handful of fishing boats still occupy the shingle beach and passers-by may even be lucky enough to buy fish directly from the fishermen as they bring their catch back into shore. Aldeburgh is also famous as the birthplace and home of composer Benjamin Britten. He founded the Aldeburgh Music Festival, which takes place in the summer, and the annual Aldeburgh Literary Festival.

Top ten things to do in Suffolk

By selecting one of our luxury holiday cottages Suffolk and its many attractions can be discovered.

1. Have a laugh at the Under the Pier Show

The Under the Pier Show is an amusement arcade with a difference. It is the work of inventor Tim Hunkin, who has hand-built most of the quirky arcade-style machines that feature within the attraction on Southwold Pier. Despite being very modern, it has a wonderfully nostalgic feel to it and will make you laugh.

2. Be enchanted by the magic of Thorepness

If ever there was a village that deserved to be called ‘fantastic’, it is Thorpeness. Created by Glencairn Stuart Ogilvie it has remained unspoilt since it was built on the Suffolk coast in the 1920s. Ogilvie’s idea was to create the ideal holiday village ‘for people who want to experience life as it was when England was Merrie England.’ The House in the Clouds is one of the country’s most famous follies, originally the village’s water tower disguised as an overgrown house.

3. Come face to face with your ancestors at Sutton Hoo

This site, with far-reaching views over the river Deben, is home to one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time. Walk around the ancient burial mounds and discover the incredible story of the ship burial of an Anglo-Saxon king and his treasured possessions. Come face to face with your ancestors and explore an award-winning exhibition, the full-size reconstruction of the burial chamber, stunning replica treasures and original finds from one of the mounds, including a prince’s sword.

4. Prepare a feast at Orford

Orford is known as a foodie paradise. On Saturdays there is a weekly food market in the town hall in the market square where locals sell their produce. There are also not one but two smokeries in Orford. Richardson Smokehouse, just off the market square, specialises in fish and cheese, and Pinneys specialises in oysters.

5. Crabbing at Walberswick

Crabbing is a fun way to spend an afternoon. There are plenty of places to do it along the coast, but none better than in Walberswick. Tucked away across the River Blyth from Southwold, the busy harbour with its dinghies, fishing boats, cruisers and yachts has a timeless quality. Local shops sell buckets, baits and lines. The village is famous for its annual crabbing competition held every August. The person who catches the single heaviest crab within a period of 90 minutes is declared the winner.

6. Get closer to nature at Minsmere

Minsmere is one of the RSPB’s most famous nature reserves. It has been an RSPB reserve for over 50 years and pioneered the use of observation hides and management of wetland areas to enable visitors to see a sample of the huge range of birds that pass along the Suffolk coast. However it is more than just a birdwatchers’ site. There is a wide network of paths and trails through heath, woodland and sand dunes.

7. Cycle the Painters’ Trail

Painters’ Trail passes through the picturesque and historic Dedham Vale, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Take in the rolling lowland countryside and locations that were made famous by local artists, such as Constable, Munnings and Gainsborough in what, for many, is the quintessential English rural landscape.

Norfolk Broads

Norfolk Broads

8. Boating on the Broads

Relax and enjoy a peaceful day out on the Norfolk Broads. The southern-most part of the Broads lies inside Suffolk, and Beccles, an historic market town on the River Waveney, is a good departure point. A river port since medieval times, it is now a popular stop for pleasure craft with its pretty riverfront bordered by Georgian gardens sloping down to the water’s edge and a quayside

9. Bet on a racing certainty at Newmarket

Newmarket is famous throughout the world as the home of horseracing. As well as watching the horses and jockeys training on the gallops at nearby Warren Hill, the National Horseracing Museum offers behind the scene tours of working stable yards.

10. Head into the forest at Thetford

Thetford Forest is Britain’s largest lowland pine forest offering a range of activities from gentle walks and cycle paths to the adrenaline pumping Go Ape, a high-wire forest adventure course of rope bridges, Tarzan swings and zip wires up to 15 metres high in the trees, and a challenging 10-mile Black Run for mountain bikers.

When it comes to luxury holiday cottages Suffolk has a great selection to suit everyone. So, why not browse our selection and see what catches your eye?

Low Farm Barn, luxury cottage in North Cove, Suffolk Check availability Low Farm Barn, North Cove, Suffolk
Sleeps 8 * 4 Bedroom(s) * 3 Bathroom(s)
Price guide: £5951089 per week * Ref: GCG5102
Pets allowed: Yes * Short breaks available: Yes * Star rating: 4

Low Farm Barn is a beautifully converted barn overlooking farmland and situated on the fringes of a quiet village and just a mile from an award winning pub. This luxury cottage retains a wealth of original character in its very comfortable interior....
The Cart Lodge, luxury cottage in Southwold, Suffolk Check availability The Cart Lodge, Southwold, Suffolk
Sleeps 4 * 2 Bedroom(s) * 1 Bathroom(s)
Price guide: £461898 per week * Ref: GCG5099
Pets allowed: No * Short breaks available: Yes * Star rating: 4

A stylishly converted barn with hot tub just three miles from Southwold, a quintessentially English seaside resort and the jewel in the crown of Suffolk coastal towns. This luxury cottage is in a tranquil, gently elevated setting affording undulating country views all around....